Verb

A verb is a word which implies action or the doing of something, or it may be defined as a word which affirms, commands or asks a question.
The simple form of the verb without inflection is called the root of the verb; e. g. love is the root of the verb “To Love.”

There are four different types of Verbs – see below for the definition, meaning and a list of examples of the many different types of Verbs:

Types of Verbs

Regular verbs

Irregular

Transitive

Intransitive

Types of Verbs

Find out the meaning an definition of the different types of Verbs including regular or irregular, transitive or intransitive with clear examples with the following information.

Definition and Examples of Regular Verbs

A verb is said to be regular when it forms the past tense by adding ‘ed’ to the present or ‘d’ if the verb ends in ‘e’.

Definition and Examples of Irregular Verbs

A verb is said to be irregular when its past tense does not end in ‘ed’

Definition and Examples of Transitive Verbs

A transitive verb is one the action of which passes over to or affects some object; as “I struck the table.” Here the action of striking affected the object table, hence struck is a transitive verb.

Definition and Examples of Intransitive Verbs

An intransitive verb is one in which the action remains with the subject; as “I walk,” “I sit” or “I run”. Many intransitive verbs, however, can be used transitively; thus, “I walk the horse;” walk is here transitive.

Verbs are inflected by number, person, tense and mood

Number and person as applied to the verb really belong to the subject; they are used with the verb to denote whether the assertion is made regarding one or more than one and whether it is made in reference to the person speaking, the person spoken to or the person or thing spoken about.

Verbs inflected by tense

In their tenses verbs follow the divisions of time. They have present tense, past tense and future tense with their variations to express the exact time of action as to an event happening, having happened or yet to happen.

Verbs inflected by mood

There are four simple moods — the Infinitive, the Indicative, the Imperative and the Subjunctive.

The Mood of a verb denotes the mode or manner in which it is used. Thus if it is used in its widest sense without reference to person or number, time or place, it is in the Infinitive Mood; as “To run.” Here we are not told who does the running, when it is done, where it is done or anything about it.

The Indicative Mood

When a verb is used to indicate or declare or ask a simple question or make any direct statement, it is in the Indicative Mood. “The boy loves his book.” Here a direct statement is made concerning the boy. “Have you a pin?” Here a simple question is asked which calls for an answer.

The Imperative Mood

When the verb is used to express a command or entreaty it is in the Imperative Mood as, “Go away.” “Give me a penny.”

The Subjunctive Mood

When the verb is used to express doubt, supposition or uncertainty or when some future action depends upon a contingency, it is in the subjunctive mood; as, “If I come, he shall remain.”

The Participles

Verbs have two participles, the present or imperfect, sometimes called the active ending in ing and the past or perfect, often called the passive, ending in ed or d. The infinitive expresses the sense of the verb in a substantive form, the participles in an adjective form; as “To rise early is healthful.” “An early rising man.” “The newly risen sun.” The participle in ing is frequently used as a substantive and consequently is equivalent to an infinitive; thus, “To rise early is healthful” and “Rising early is healthful” are the same.

Present Indicative, Past Indicative and Past Participle

The principal parts of a verb are the Present Indicative, Past Indicative and Past Participle as in:

Parts of Verbs

Present Indicative

Past Indicative

Past Participle

Love

Loved

Loved

Parts

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